John Carroll: The “Big Boss”

Born in Bedford, Ohio, John Carroll worked for Ohio oil companies until 1936 when he became manager of his father’s 55,000 acre Carrollton Ranch in Deer Park.  In 1947, he became Vice President of the First National Bank of Kissimmee, retiring in 1975 as Chairman of the Board.  John was one of the sixteen horsemen who rode in the inaugural parade for Governor Spessard Holland in 1941.  He was a charter member of the Silver Spurs quadrille, helped organize the Silver Spurs Riding Club and was its first “Big Boss” in 1942.  At the age of 81, John was honored by being named “Coca Cola Cowboy” in 1988 by the Club. 

Mary Essie Petrie Caldwell: Dine with the Departed “Passed” Resident

Mary Essie Petrie Caldwell was featured at the first Dine with the Departed event hosted by the Osceola County Historical Society in 2010.  Of distinguished Hugenot ancestry, Essie, as she was fondly known, was born June 3, 1838 in Cheraw, South Carolina to Reverend George H.W. Petrie and his wife Mary Jane.  Rev. Petrie was an eminent clergyman of the Southern Presbyterian Church and Essie’s grandfather was an officer in the American Revolution.

Ernest P. “Kayo” Murphy

The nickname “Kayo” would follow Ernest Patrick Murphy, all his life and only strangers would call him Ernest. In February, 1942;Ernest P. “Kayo” Murphy Kayo was drafted into the U.S. Army. Assigned to the 504 Parachute Infantry Regiment of the famous 82nd Airborne Division, he fought for 2 ½ years in major campaigns in the Mediterranean and European Theater of Operations. The Purple Heart was awarded to Sgt. Murphy for wounds received at Anzio Beachhead in Italy, along with a Battlefield Commission to 2nd Lieutenant during that battle.

Top 26 Reasons to Attend the 26th Annual Pioneer Day Event

Every once in a while an event rolls around that you just don’t want to miss…this year, that event is the Osceola County Historical Society’s 26th Annual Pioneer Day Event!

Here are the Top 26 Reasons to Attend the 26th Annual Pioneer Day Event!

Company B Reunion

Company B 2nd Florida Infantry unit has been featured in previous blogs, but have you wondered what happened to these men?   News articles discovered in the Osceola County Historical Society archives tell of a reunion held by the “Border Boys”, an appropriate name for the U.S. Army horsemen who crossed the Rio Grande from Texas in 1916 to fight the Mexican bandit, Pancho Villa.  In the fall of 1969 invitations were sent to twenty of the surviving members, thirteen still resided in Kissimmee and two in St. Cloud, while others lived in California.  Fifteen or sixteen reunions had previously been held on the ranch of Jennings Overstreet, whose father Mack was one of the “Border Boys”.

History is Happening!
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