Narcoosee Shaker Colony

The Shakers, a short name taken by the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, trace their beliefs to the early traditions of the church and more particularly to a 17th century group of French Protestants known as Camisards or Prophets. They were driven from France to England and disappeared from view but did pass on their beliefs to a group of Quakers who were attracted by the similar faith.

Osceola County Cattle Drive and RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo Recap

Cattle has always been an important part of the history of Kissimmee. The streets of downtown Kissimmee were once grass where cattle roamed freely and grazed; effectively providing a mowing service. There is even a well-known story about a cow finding its way into the Kissimmee courthouse! It is only fitting that today we celebrate this history with a cattle drive that begins on the lawn of the courthouse and continues into downtown Kissimmee. This exciting event is the kickoff for the RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo at Osceola County’s Silver Spurs Rodeo.

100 years ago in Osceola County: History Repeats Itself

An interesting parallel between 1917 and 2017 was found in an April 12, 1917, “St. Cloud Tribune” news article which states,“Mr. H.A. Haymaker of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania purchased the entire block situated between the Atlantic Coast Line depot and the Bank.” The property was unoccupied and used only as a park for a number of years. The article continues, “Mr. Haymaker’s plans involve the erection of a building to cover the entire block, from three to five stories in height, the lower floors to be reserved for stores and business houses, while the upper floors will be finished up in either apartments or for hotel purposes.”

The Rise and Fall of the Runnymede Lodge

A large hotel was erected about 1885 west of Narcoossee on the shores of East Lake Tohopekaliga and near Lake Runnymede. Although it is not clear who had it built, a 1912 newspaper article claims it was built by the Disston Sugar Company. John L. Hill owned the hotel and property, then sold it to the Runnymede Planting Company in 1892.

Artifact Spotlight: European Glass Trade Beads

In the last weeks of Florida Archaeology Month, let’s talk beads. Beads are an important part of Native American cultures. The size, shape, color, and material of beads denotes status in many native cultures. Early beads found in Florida and the greater Eastern coastal region were made from clay, bone and shell.

History is Happening!
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