Company B Reunion

Company B 2nd Florida Infantry unit has been featured in previous blogs, but have you wondered what happened to these men?   News articles discovered in the Osceola County Historical Society archives tell of a reunion held by the “Border Boys”, an appropriate name for the U.S. Army horsemen who crossed the Rio Grande from Texas in 1916 to fight the Mexican bandit, Pancho Villa.  In the fall of 1969 invitations were sent to twenty of the surviving members, thirteen still resided in Kissimmee and two in St. Cloud, while others lived in California.  Fifteen or sixteen reunions had previously been held on the ranch of Jennings Overstreet, whose father Mack was one of the “Border Boys”.

American Red Cross: The Kissimmee Chapter

Many school children learned that Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross in Washington, DC on May 21, 1881. She heard of the Swiss global Red Cross network while visiting Europe following the Civil War.

With the beginning of World War I, the organization experienced phenomenal growth. There were 107 chapters in 1904; by 1918, 3,864 chapters had been organized.

St. Cloud Sugar Mill

The Disston Land Company stopped meeting the notes on the mortgage of the St. Cloud Sugar Mill after July 1895 and the sugar mill laid dormant between 1897, and 1901. In 1900, all the mill machinery was sold to Sabal Bros. of Jacksonville but not actually removed from the area. In January, 1901, it was resold to the Redo Brothers of Mexico for a reputed $75,000.

Artifact Spotlight: The Pulpit

When entering a church, most eyes are drawn to the front of the building where there usually stands a pulpit. The pulpit is the focal point and perhaps one of the most important pieces of furniture.Shingle Creek Methodist Church’s pulpit finds its new home in the replica church at the Pioneer Village at Shingle Creek. The new building will be celebrated with a ribbon cutting ceremony on June 7, 2017.

Narcoosee Shaker Colony

The Shakers, a short name taken by the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, trace their beliefs to the early traditions of the church and more particularly to a 17th century group of French Protestants known as Camisards or Prophets. They were driven from France to England and disappeared from view but did pass on their beliefs to a group of Quakers who were attracted by the similar faith.

History is Happening!
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