Narcoosee Shaker Colony

The Shakers, a short name taken by the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, trace their beliefs to the early traditions of the church and more particularly to a 17th century group of French Protestants known as Camisards or Prophets. They were driven from France to England and disappeared from view but did pass on their beliefs to a group of Quakers who were attracted by the similar faith.

Story Time at the Museum

Every third Wednesday of the month the Osceola County Historical Society hosts an interactive reading event. Gather around the fireplace at the Osceola County Welcome Center and History Museum to listen to a carefully chosen children’s book, whose theme compliments our current temporary exhibit. After storytelling by the fireplace, we move into the Buster Kenton Room to let our creative side run loose as we craft a themed art project. While our event is targeted towards children ages 3 to 6, we welcome kids of all ages to join in the fun of Story Time at the Museum.

100 years ago in Osceola County: History Repeats Itself

An interesting parallel between 1917 and 2017 was found in an April 12, 1917, “St. Cloud Tribune” news article which states,“Mr. H.A. Haymaker of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania purchased the entire block situated between the Atlantic Coast Line depot and the Bank.” The property was unoccupied and used only as a park for a number of years. The article continues, “Mr. Haymaker’s plans involve the erection of a building to cover the entire block, from three to five stories in height, the lower floors to be reserved for stores and business houses, while the upper floors will be finished up in either apartments or for hotel purposes.”

The Rise and Fall of the Runnymede Lodge

A large hotel was erected about 1885 west of Narcoossee on the shores of East Lake Tohopekaliga and near Lake Runnymede. Although it is not clear who had it built, a 1912 newspaper article claims it was built by the Disston Sugar Company. John L. Hill owned the hotel and property, then sold it to the Runnymede Planting Company in 1892.

Banana Cake: One of Dixie’s Favorites

Last month we shared a blog about a sweet potatoe pie that built a church. As a special treat this month we are sharing another recipe. This recipe for Banana Cake can be found in “Yesteryear and Today 1840 – 2006”, a collection of recipes by Dixie Myrtice Bronson Nickle. Dixie decicated this recipe book to her mother Ada Bernice Bronson, who taught Dixie how to cook as a young girl.

History is Happening!
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